A public charter is one in which a tour operator rents the aircraft and advertises and sells seats to members of the public, either directly or through a travel agent. In the case of public charters, the flight must be filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the tour operator must supply a charter prospectus. The tour operator also must assume a legal responsibility to provide the transportation service, and must abide by DOT requirements for the protection of the clients' money. Public charters often operate only seasonally, and are often sold as part of a vacation package deal, although spare seats may be offered at bargain prices.
Every aspect of our operations at PACI revolves around a steadfast commitment to safety. To ensure maximum safety for our customers, all aircraft operated by PACI are IS-BAO Registered, ARGUS Platinum Rated, Wyvern Approved and have a robust Safety Management System (SMS) and a comprehensive Emergency Response Plan (ERP). All charter flights are tracked by FAA licensed dispatchers in our 24/7 Operation Control Center. Pentastar Aviation meets the maximum industry safety standards.
Once you've got a price quote, it's worth the effort to call around and get three or four other quotes. Prices vary widely, and one of the most important things to know is that you will often be paying for the plane to get to you, also known as the repositioning fee. Additional charges, common to a lot of flights, include airport charges. At New Jersey's Teterboro, it's $100, while some airports with higher density have an added fee. There are also takeoff fees to consider.
Our flight concierge services are built upon the idea attention to detail — a concept that extends beyond safety and timely travel — delivering comfort and satisfaction on every flight. No request is too big or small; whether your needs involve ground transportation, meals, entertainment, cabin comfort or security, we are standing by to accommodate your every need. Let our client service representatives help you before your trip so you may relax and enjoy your flight when the time comes.
Purchasing an aircraft is a significant investment. As with any major purchase, private aircraft buyers want to be sure they’re seeing all the available private jets for sale that meet their criteria, so that they can compare the price, configuration and condition of all such currently available private jets for sale worldwide. Moreover, many buyers who plunge into the market without the help of an expert advisor may not even have properly identified the best airplane for their needs, and a buyer can’t make a great deal on the wrong airplane.

The preowned aircraft market has changed significantly over just the past couple of years, with aircraft values changing more quickly and the prices shown on the Web typically bearing little relation to actual selling prices. Your professional Aircraft Broker has access to the very latest aircraft listings and pricing information that simply won’t be available or readily accessible otherwise.


JetSmarter, around since 2013, is an example of a player in the private aviation space selling shared flights. The company operates on a membership model: Fliers pay a minimum of $15,000 a year and book seats on already scheduled flights through the JetSmarter app, which lists more than 150 domestic and international trips a day. Trips under three hours are included in the cost of the membership while longer ones are an average of $300 a person, according to Sergey Petrossov, the company’s chief executive officer; most flights have an average of eight to 10 passengers.


Under American and British accounting rules, a finance lease is generally defined as one in which the lessor receives substantially all rights of ownership, or in which the present value of the minimum lease payments for the duration of the lease exceeds 90% of the fair market value of the aircraft. If a lease is defined as a finance lease, it must be counted as an asset of the company, in contrast to an operating lease which only affects the company's cash flow.

Though the early Lockheed Jetstar had four, most production business jets have two jet engines, mostly rear-mounted podded engine. If mounted below their low wing, it wouldn't allow sufficient engine clearance without a too long landing gear. The HondaJet is the exception with its over the wing engine pods. Dassault Falcon still builds three-engine models derived from the Falcon 50, and the very light jet market has seen several single-engine design concepts and the introduction of the Cirrus Vision SF50 in 2016.
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