Finance leasing, also known as "capital leasing", is a longer-term arrangement in which the operator comes closer to effectively "owning" the aircraft. It involves a more complicated transaction in which a lessor, often a special purpose company (SPC) or partnership, purchases the aircraft through a combination of debt and equity financing, and then leases it to the operator. The operator may have the option to purchase the aircraft at the expiration of the lease, or may automatically receive the aircraft at the expiration of the lease.
As private jets are constantly moving between locations, the guide prices provided below are based on various data sources relating to the aircraft's last known position. Due to this, not ALL available aircraft are included within the search results. So please contact one of our charter experts for a fixed quotation, as they are aware of all aircraft available in specific locations at any given time.

Using a private jet rental to get to a holiday destination ensures the additional benefit of access to private terminals for faster security check-ins, ensuring that more time is spent enjoying the getaway instead of waiting in line. With its ability to access more locations around the world and enhanced potential for personalisation, chartering privately is the perfect way to travel for pleasure.

Stratos Jet Charters, Inc. Serves As An Agent For Air Charter Services On Behalf Of Our Clients. All Aircraft And Air Carriers Selected By Stratos Jet Charters Are Fully Certified By The Federal Aviation Administration And The U.S. Department Of Transportation Under Part 135 Regulations. Carriers Are Solely Responsible For The Air Transportation Arranged On Behalf Of Stratos Jet Charters Clients. Stratos Jet Charters Does Not Own Or Operate Any Aircraft. Stratos Jet Charters Is Not A Direct Or Indirect Air Carrier. All Flights Chartered Through Stratos Jet Charters Are Operated By Part 135 Air Carriers. © 2007-201​8 STRATOS JET CHARTERS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
A single-entity charter is one in which an individual or company charters a plane and bears the entire cost of the flight, so that the passengers do not pay their own airfare. There is no minimum passenger requirement, since the cost is per flight, not per person. Single-entity charters are typically used for business purposes -- for example, travel to meetings and conferences, incentive travel or VIP leisure travel.
Fractional ownership of aircraft involves an individual or corporation who pays an upfront equity share for the cost of an aircraft. If four parties are involved, a partner would pay one-fourth of the aircraft price (a "quarter share"). That partner is now an equity owner in that aircraft and can sell the equity position if necessary. This also entitles the new owner to a certain number of hours of flight time on that aircraft, or any comparable aircraft in the fleet. Additional fees include monthly management fees and incidentals such as catering and ground transportation. In the United States, fractional-ownership operations may be regulated by either FAA part 91 or part 135.
Stratos Jet Charters, Inc. Serves As An Agent For Air Charter Services On Behalf Of Our Clients. All Aircraft And Air Carriers Selected By Stratos Jet Charters Are Fully Certified By The Federal Aviation Administration And The U.S. Department Of Transportation Under Part 135 Regulations. Carriers Are Solely Responsible For The Air Transportation Arranged On Behalf Of Stratos Jet Charters Clients. Stratos Jet Charters Does Not Own Or Operate Any Aircraft. Stratos Jet Charters Is Not A Direct Or Indirect Air Carrier. All Flights Chartered Through Stratos Jet Charters Are Operated By Part 135 Air Carriers. © 2007-201​8 STRATOS JET CHARTERS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Another important factor Fazal-Karim suggests considering is the length of time you plan to own a plane. He says the average period of ownership is one decade, and typical depreciation in aircraft value drops about 10 percent to 15 percent in the first year with a further 10 percent each subsequent year. Due to low inventory and high demand for pre-owned aircraft, the Jetcraft Market Forecast predicts depreciation rates will improve over the next 10 years. Jetcraft
Ms. Broder booked a jet charter this March from New Jersey to Las Vegas for her client Steven Michaels, an entrepreneur from Cherry Hill, N.J., and seven of his friends. The trip was in celebration of several of the men turning 50, and the group wanted an extravagant getaway. First-class tickets worked out to close to $2,000 a person round trip, while chartering an eight-seat Citation III jet was $3,500 each. When presented with both options, Mr. Michaels said that going private was a no-brainer. “The journey was like paying for a high-end tour or excursion and ended up being one of the most fun parts of the trip,” he said.
Equipment trust certificate (ETC): Most commonly used in North America. A trust of investors purchases the aircraft and then "leases" it to the operator, on condition that the airline will receive title upon full performance of the lease. ETCs blur the line between finance leasing and secured lending, and in their most recent forms have begun to resemble securitization arrangements.
In the United States, business aircraft may be operated under either FAR 91 as private operations for the business purposes of the owner, or under FAR 135 as commercial operations for the business purposes of a third party. One common arrangement for operational flexibility purposes is for the aircraft's owner to operate the aircraft under FAR 91 when needed for its own purposes, and to allow a third-party charter-manager to operate it under FAR 135 when the aircraft is needed for the business purposes of third parties (such as for other entities within the corporate group of the aircraft's owner).[16]
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