The reality of the Web is that it provides a very incomplete picture of private jets for sale or the private jet marketplace. In the last few years the pre-owned aircraft market has changed significantly; the values of aircraft change more quickly and the prices shown on the Web bear little relation to what such aircraft actually sell for. Moreover, many of the best aircraft for sale never appear on the Internet, as they’re bought and sold among brokers for their clients without ever being listed for sale. Moreover, many buyers who plunge into the market without the help of an expert advisor may not even have properly identified the best airplane for their needs, and a buyer can make a great deal on the wrong airplane. That is why The Private Jet Company made it their principal focus to spend whatever time is necessary to understand the buyer's specific needs and preferences to be able to present the best value private aircrafts that fulfill the buyer's needs and offer the best value for the buyer's dollars. The founder of TPJC and all its brokers make it their goal to become a trusted advisor to the buyer to not only present the currently available aircraft on the market, but to assist in negotiating the deal, recommending legal and tax advisors, aircraft inspection specialists, suitable FBO facilities and any other services to assist in consummating the best possible deal for the aircraft purchase.
Lastly, don't be afraid to ask about safety: Any reputable operator should have safety information prominently featured on their website, and won't mind answering questions about their pilots, such as how many hours they have flown. (At least 250 hours, which is what it takes to get a commercial license; NetJets mandates at least 2,500 hours; Wheels Up, mandates 7,000 hours for a captain and 4,000 for a first officer.) Gollan suggests fliers ask if the pilot has any health issues, and feel free to ask if the operator (or plane itself) have any accidents or incidents in its history.
An affinity charter is slightly different in that, although all of the passengers are affiliated with a specific business, group or organization, each pays his own air fare. The passengers might sports or music fans traveling to a special event, or a bunch of friends going on vacation. With this type of charter, none of the seats can be sold to members of public.
After a nap, why not wake up with coffee or entertain guests in the living room? This mockup represents part of the Melody interior product that Airbus can use when outfitting a plane. It includes larger entryways between the various zones of the plane (sleeping, working, relaxing, for example) instead of the traditional doors found on other private planes. Airbus
There are some significant additional caveats to discount private plane travel. Often these deals are only for one-way flights, so they will then need to find an alternative way back. It’s also important to understand that there may be extra fees added to the cost of your flight — such as airport or landing fees — so read the contract to determine what’s included and what’s not. De-icing fees, for example, can be significant and may be passed on to consumers, says Jeff Trance, the SVP of private jets for the U.S. for jet charter company Air Partner.
Like scheduled airline service, private jets also have weight limits with regard to the amount of luggage that can be stowed during a trip. Items such as skis and golf clubs are allowed as long as they conform to the dimensions and weight limits of the aircraft. These weight limits vary by aircraft type. Ask your charter sales representative if you have concerns about excess baggage or special items to be included in your luggage.
For the decade starting in 2017, Aviation Week predicts 11,346 deliveries of business aircraft (jets or not) valued at $250.1 billion, with a fleet growing from 31,864 aircraft to 36,702 aircraft (64% in North America): 4,838 more at an average annual growth rate of 1.6%, with 5,835 retirements. For the coming five-year period, Textron Aviation should lead the market with a 22.8% market share, followed by Bombardier with 20.4%, Embraer with 16.6%, Gulfstream with 15%, Dassault with 8.4% then the rest of manufacturers with 16.9%. There should be 22,190 Engine deliveries, led by the Honeywell HTF7000, Williams FJ44, Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A Medium, Pratt & Whitney Canada PW300 and the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A Large. The average utilization should be 365 flight hours per aircraft per year.[12]
×