Companies like Surf Air and FLITE Air Taxi can charge less than big-name competitors, in part, because they use different planes — like, for example, single-prop turbo planes — that cost less to operate because they use less fuel than larger jets. “The operational cost can be a fraction of other planes,” says Justin Hart, vice president of Surf Air memberships.
No matter what company you're flying with, be sure to ask if there two pilots or one. (Though two pilots are standard on commercial flights, regulations vary for private planes of all sizes.) It also helps to ask if the operator owns the plane—typically, companies that own their planes offer better service. Never forget to ask about daily minimums and taxi fees. "If the hourly rate is $9,000 and you have a single 40-minute flight, you might assume you are going to pay $6,000," says Doug Gollan, creator of PrivateJetCardComparisons.com. "But if your provider has a daily minimum of 1.5 hours, you are going to actually be charged $13,500, plus taxi time, which in my comparisons I have found varies between being included and up to 12 minutes per segment."
Hong Kong leveraged lease: In Hong Kong, where income taxes are low in comparison to other countries, leveraged leasing to local operators is common. In such transactions, a locally incorporated lessor acquires an aircraft through a combination of non-recourse debt, recourse debt, and equity (generally in a 49-16-35 proportion), and thus be able to claim depreciation allowances despite only being liable for half of the purchase price. Its high tax losses can then be set off against profits from leasing the aircraft to a local carrier. Due to local tax laws, these investments are set up as general partnerships, in which the investors' liability is mainly limited by insurance and by contract with the operator.
Encounter the world’s most amazing wildlife — from the Philippines’ majestic yet gentle whale shark to the gorillas and chimpanzees of East Africa’s jungles — as well as the enduring peoples and cultures that have flourished alongside them. Travel in style on a journey spanning two continents and filled with authentic local encounters, five-star hospitality and A&K’s hallmark blend of insider access and local expertise.
Customers can opt for a number of interior setups including a bedroom or living area. Given the range of the ACJ320neo, inflight naps would be a must for on-the-go travelers. Customers love the plane for its spacious cabin interiors, which are nearly twice the size of planes within the same price range from Gulfstream and Bombardier, according to Airbus. Airbus
With access to over 5,000 aircraft worldwide, Blue Star Jets has the experience in locating the best possible aircraft for your mission. Operators providing service for Blue Star Jets clients in the United States must meet standards set forth by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for safety, security and service and operate under Part 135 of the FAA regulations.

After a nap, why not wake up with coffee or entertain guests in the living room? This mockup represents part of the Melody interior product that Airbus can use when outfitting a plane. It includes larger entryways between the various zones of the plane (sleeping, working, relaxing, for example) instead of the traditional doors found on other private planes. Airbus
The very light jet (VLJ) is a classification initiated by the release of the Eclipse 500,[19][20][21] on 31 December 2006, which was originally available at around US$1.5 million, cheaper than existing business jets and comparable with turboprop airplanes. It accompanied a bubble for air taxi services, exemplified by DayJet which ceased operations on September 2008, Eclipse Aviation failed to sustain its business model and filed for bankruptcy in February 2009.
In 2017 Honeywell predicts 8,600 aircraft to be delivered during the next decade for a total value of $264 Billion. Its breakdown is 57% big (85% in value) - super-midsize to business liner, 18% midsize (8% in value) - light-medium to medium, and 25% small (7% in value); the global demand is expected to come from North America for 61%, 15% from Latin America, 14% from Europe, 6% from Asia-Pacific and 4% from Middle East and Africa.[11]
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