Finance leasing, also known as "capital leasing", is a longer-term arrangement in which the operator comes closer to effectively "owning" the aircraft. It involves a more complicated transaction in which a lessor, often a special purpose company (SPC) or partnership, purchases the aircraft through a combination of debt and equity financing, and then leases it to the operator. The operator may have the option to purchase the aircraft at the expiration of the lease, or may automatically receive the aircraft at the expiration of the lease.
Because the cost of a high-end modern private aircraft may be tens of millions of dollars, lending for aircraft purchases is accompanied by a security interest in the aircraft, so that the aircraft may be repossessed in event of nonpayment. It is generally very difficult for borrowers to obtain affordable private unsecured financing of an aircraft purchase, unless the borrower is deemed particularly creditworthy (e.g. an established carrier with high equity and a steady cash flow).
On a Charter Flight, passengers aren’t limited to on of 2 or 3 entrees being served. They can literally design their own meal or order from a restaurant of their choice to be enjoyed while traveling in supreme comfort.  There is also a wide variety of entertainment options on a charter flight. Many aircraft used for charter flights have free WiFi, high end sound or entertainment systems with iPhone/Android hook-ups and even satellite TV.
Another important factor Fazal-Karim suggests considering is the length of time you plan to own a plane. He says the average period of ownership is one decade, and typical depreciation in aircraft value drops about 10 percent to 15 percent in the first year with a further 10 percent each subsequent year. Due to low inventory and high demand for pre-owned aircraft, the Jetcraft Market Forecast predicts depreciation rates will improve over the next 10 years. Jetcraft
In the United States, business aircraft may be operated under either FAR 91 as private operations for the business purposes of the owner, or under FAR 135 as commercial operations for the business purposes of a third party. One common arrangement for operational flexibility purposes is for the aircraft's owner to operate the aircraft under FAR 91 when needed for its own purposes, and to allow a third-party charter-manager to operate it under FAR 135 when the aircraft is needed for the business purposes of third parties (such as for other entities within the corporate group of the aircraft's owner).[16]
Privacy is one of the main advantages of a charter flight.  Unlike a commercial flight, where travelers are herded through a crowded airport, having to undergo an intrusive security screening, passengers on a charter flight depart from a private facility known as an FBO.  At most private airports, passengers can pull their cars right up to the plane.
The Gulfstream G650ER, which retails for $70.15 million fully outfitted, can travel 7,500 nautical miles/13,890 kilometers at Mach 0.85. When flying even faster at Mach 0.90, it can carry eight passengers 6,400 nm/11,853 km. Hodge adds that it is important to know the general travel mission when determining the size of the plane. If certain airports are used, a broker can help buyers understand if a plane can regularly take off and land there with a full payload. Gulfstream
Those living on the East Coast will soon be able to fly with Beacon, another monthly membership airline, which will begin flying later this summer, starting with 18-20 daily flights between New York and Boston, as well as seasonally in the Hamptons and Nantucket. Memberships start at $2,000 per month (plus a $1000 initiation fee, which will be waived if you join before Sept. 1, 2015).
The reality of the Web is that it provides a very incomplete picture of private jets for sale or the private jet marketplace. In the last few years the pre-owned aircraft market has changed significantly; the values of aircraft change more quickly and the prices shown on the Web bear little relation to what such aircraft actually sell for. Moreover, many of the best aircraft for sale never appear on the Internet, as they’re bought and sold among brokers for their clients without ever being listed for sale. Moreover, many buyers who plunge into the market without the help of an expert advisor may not even have properly identified the best airplane for their needs, and a buyer can make a great deal on the wrong airplane. That is why The Private Jet Company made it their principal focus to spend whatever time is necessary to understand the buyer's specific needs and preferences to be able to present the best value private aircrafts that fulfill the buyer's needs and offer the best value for the buyer's dollars. The founder of TPJC and all its brokers make it their goal to become a trusted advisor to the buyer to not only present the currently available aircraft on the market, but to assist in negotiating the deal, recommending legal and tax advisors, aircraft inspection specialists, suitable FBO facilities and any other services to assist in consummating the best possible deal for the aircraft purchase.
Convenience - There are over 5,000 airports in the US that private planes can use (vs 500 airports for larger commercial aircraft). This means you can often land closer to your true destination. In the summer of 2006 the ban on liquids caused all sorts of inconveniences for people flying commercially, but private flyers avoided all this. Private planes also mean that you can travel with your special belongings such as instruments, sports gear, product samples or bring your pet in the cabin.
How can these and other similar companies afford to offer such low rates? One reason is that sites like JetSuite.com are offering seats on flights that would have been empty or at least not full. “Over 40% of flights that are flying private have empty seats,” says Steve King, the co-founder of private jet charter company AeroIQ. Many times, these flights are simply repositioning so they can pick up passengers in another city and the companies would rather get some money from passengers than no money.
Cessna simultaneously developed the Citation Mustang,[22][19][20] a six-place twinjet (2 crew + 4 passengers), followed by the Embraer Phenom 100[22][19][20][21] and the Honda Jet.[19][21] They have a maximum takeoff weight lighter than the FAR Part 23 12,500 pounds limit, and are approved for single-pilot operation. They typically accommodate 5-7 passengers over a 965 nmi average range, with a $3.6M mean price. Some VLJs such as the Eclipse and Mustang have no or limited lavatory facilities.[23]
In 2017 Honeywell predicts 8,600 aircraft to be delivered during the next decade for a total value of $264 Billion. Its breakdown is 57% big (85% in value) - super-midsize to business liner, 18% midsize (8% in value) - light-medium to medium, and 25% small (7% in value); the global demand is expected to come from North America for 61%, 15% from Latin America, 14% from Europe, 6% from Asia-Pacific and 4% from Middle East and Africa.[11]
×