Another important factor Fazal-Karim suggests considering is the length of time you plan to own a plane. He says the average period of ownership is one decade, and typical depreciation in aircraft value drops about 10 percent to 15 percent in the first year with a further 10 percent each subsequent year. Due to low inventory and high demand for pre-owned aircraft, the Jetcraft Market Forecast predicts depreciation rates will improve over the next 10 years. Jetcraft
A single-entity charter is one in which an individual or company charters a plane and bears the entire cost of the flight, so that the passengers do not pay their own airfare. There is no minimum passenger requirement, since the cost is per flight, not per person. Single-entity charters are typically used for business purposes -- for example, travel to meetings and conferences, incentive travel or VIP leisure travel.
Ms. Broder frequently books private jets for clients and gets a weekly list from several private jet companies of empty leg availability for the coming week (other agents specializing in private jet travel also get similar lists). Recent flights included an $8,500 trip from Naples to Cleveland on a Beechjet 400A, a plane that seats seven people, and a $6,500 trip from Scottsdale, Ariz., to Colorado Springs on a Learjet 45XR, accommodating eight fliers.
According to Jahid Fazal-Karim, owner and chairman of the board of Jetcraft, the sweet spot for buying a plane is between three and five years old in terms of value. Fazal-Karim knows what he is talking about, having overseen more than 500 transactions worth over $10 billion in value since he started his career at Jetcraft in 2008. He is often referred to as one of the most powerful players in business and private aviation. Jetcraft
Aircraft brokers make it their goal to become trusted advisors to the buyer. A professional Aircraft Broker will not only present the most current and desirable available aircraft on the market; they will also guide the buyer throughout the entire transaction, including price negotiations, as well as recommendations for legal and tax advisors, aircraft inspection specialists, suitable FBO facilities, and any other services to assist in consummating the best possible deal for the aircraft purchase.

At Charter Jet One, we are dedicated to providing our clients with door-to-door service. This means our flight concierge services can arrange ground transportation before your departure and after your arrival. On the strength of a worldwide network of transportation providers, Charter Jet One arranges ground travel in more than 480 cities worldwide.
Charter, also called air taxi or ad-hoc flights require certification from the associated country's regulating body such as the FAA in the U.S. The regulations are differentiated from typical commercial/passenger service by offering a non-scheduled service. In the U.S. these flights are regulated under FAA Part 135[1]. There are some cases where a charter operator can sell scheduled flights, but only in limited quantities[2].
After a nap, why not wake up with coffee or entertain guests in the living room? This mockup represents part of the Melody interior product that Airbus can use when outfitting a plane. It includes larger entryways between the various zones of the plane (sleeping, working, relaxing, for example) instead of the traditional doors found on other private planes. Airbus
In the United States, business aircraft may be operated under either FAR 91 as private operations for the business purposes of the owner, or under FAR 135 as commercial operations for the business purposes of a third party. One common arrangement for operational flexibility purposes is for the aircraft's owner to operate the aircraft under FAR 91 when needed for its own purposes, and to allow a third-party charter-manager to operate it under FAR 135 when the aircraft is needed for the business purposes of third parties (such as for other entities within the corporate group of the aircraft's owner).[16]
For the decade starting in 2017, Aviation Week predicts 11,346 deliveries of business aircraft (jets or not) valued at $250.1 billion, with a fleet growing from 31,864 aircraft to 36,702 aircraft (64% in North America): 4,838 more at an average annual growth rate of 1.6%, with 5,835 retirements. For the coming five-year period, Textron Aviation should lead the market with a 22.8% market share, followed by Bombardier with 20.4%, Embraer with 16.6%, Gulfstream with 15%, Dassault with 8.4% then the rest of manufacturers with 16.9%. There should be 22,190 Engine deliveries, led by the Honeywell HTF7000, Williams FJ44, Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A Medium, Pratt & Whitney Canada PW300 and the Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A Large. The average utilization should be 365 flight hours per aircraft per year.[12]
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