All flights are operated by U.S. 14 CFR Part 135 air carriers ("operators"), the names of which are disclosed to our customers prior to booking travel. Operators providing service for Air Taxi Service and Support LLC d/b/a Linear Air (ATSS) bookings must meet standards set forth by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and by ATSS. ATSS does not manage or operate aircraft on behalf of our customers, and is not itself an operator, and is a subsidiary of AirDialog LLC, a Direct Air Carrier operating under FAA certificate number L41A034L. Video footage used with permission from Cirrus Aircraft.
Japanese leveraged lease: A JLL requires the establishment of a special purpose company to acquire the aircraft, and at least 20% of the equity in the company must be held by Japanese nationals. Widebody aircraft are leased for 12 years, while narrowbody aircraft are leased for 10 years. Under a JLL, the airline receives tax deductions in its home country, and the Japanese investors are exempt from taxation on their investment. JLLs were encouraged in the early 1990s as a form of re-exporting currency generated by Japan's trade surplus
At Charter Jet One, we are dedicated to providing our clients with door-to-door service. This means our flight concierge services can arrange ground transportation before your departure and after your arrival. On the strength of a worldwide network of transportation providers, Charter Jet One arranges ground travel in more than 480 cities worldwide.
The Bombardier Challenger 600 began as a proof-of-concept business aircraft design from American aircraft pioneer Bill Lear. The design was subsequently purchased by Canadair, the predecessor to Bombardier, in the late 1970s. Canadair further refined the design and certified the aircraft in 1980. The type really “took off,” so to speak, with the follow-on Challenger 601, introduced in 1983, which replaced its predecessor’s Avro Lycoming engines with modern General Electric CF43-1A turbofans designed for high-utilization commercial airline service.
Fliers with flexibility should sign up for empty-leg email lists of companies like Magellan Jets, who regularly send out emails selling discounted flights from, say, the plane of a corporate exec who flew to Los Angeles but is looking to offset his cost of getting the plane back to New York. “I wouldn’t say that the cost of flying private has gone down, but there are new ways of pricing charter that makes it more accessible,” says David Zipkin, co-founder and VP of Tradewind, the service known for semi-private flights in the Northeast and Caribbean. “In our case, we save people money with our shared charters, and we also sell discounted empty legs.”
Aircraft leases are often used by private aircraft operators, as leases provide the same level of access to an aircraft that ownership provides, without the capital expenditure buying a business jet requires. Leases are offered in two main forms: wet leasing, normally used for short-term access; and dry leasing, typically used for longer term leases. Under wet leases, flight crews are provided in tandem with the aircraft, while operators of dry leased aircraft supply their own crews. Combination wet-dry leases may also be offered, as when an aircraft is wet leased to establish service, and once an in-house flight crew is trained, switched to a dry lease.
Ms. Broder booked a jet charter this March from New Jersey to Las Vegas for her client Steven Michaels, an entrepreneur from Cherry Hill, N.J., and seven of his friends. The trip was in celebration of several of the men turning 50, and the group wanted an extravagant getaway. First-class tickets worked out to close to $2,000 a person round trip, while chartering an eight-seat Citation III jet was $3,500 each. When presented with both options, Mr. Michaels said that going private was a no-brainer. “The journey was like paying for a high-end tour or excursion and ended up being one of the most fun parts of the trip,” he said.
Currently, approximately 10 percent of the worldwide fleet of private aircraft is for sale. That serves to keep prices down; however, the projected decrease in new private jet deliveries could bring an uptick in transaction prices on preowned aircraft, particularly over the next 2-3 years. Aviation consultants and industry professionals have also reported seeing a recent rise in the number of first time private plane buyers brought into the market by today's bargain prices for private jets.
In 2017 Honeywell predicts 8,600 aircraft to be delivered during the next decade for a total value of $264 Billion. Its breakdown is 57% big (85% in value) - super-midsize to business liner, 18% midsize (8% in value) - light-medium to medium, and 25% small (7% in value); the global demand is expected to come from North America for 61%, 15% from Latin America, 14% from Europe, 6% from Asia-Pacific and 4% from Middle East and Africa.[11]
×