Fractional ownership of aircraft involves an individual or corporation who pays an upfront equity share for the cost of an aircraft. If four parties are involved, a partner would pay one-fourth of the aircraft price (a "quarter share"). That partner is now an equity owner in that aircraft and can sell the equity position if necessary. This also entitles the new owner to a certain number of hours of flight time on that aircraft, or any comparable aircraft in the fleet. Additional fees include monthly management fees and incidentals such as catering and ground transportation. In the United States, fractional-ownership operations may be regulated by either FAA part 91 or part 135.

The Gulfstream G650ER, which retails for $70.15 million fully outfitted, can travel 7,500 nautical miles/13,890 kilometers at Mach 0.85. When flying even faster at Mach 0.90, it can carry eight passengers 6,400 nm/11,853 km. Hodge adds that it is important to know the general travel mission when determining the size of the plane. If certain airports are used, a broker can help buyers understand if a plane can regularly take off and land there with a full payload. Gulfstream
Lastly, don't be afraid to ask about safety: Any reputable operator should have safety information prominently featured on their website, and won't mind answering questions about their pilots, such as how many hours they have flown. (At least 250 hours, which is what it takes to get a commercial license; NetJets mandates at least 2,500 hours; Wheels Up, mandates 7,000 hours for a captain and 4,000 for a first officer.) Gollan suggests fliers ask if the pilot has any health issues, and feel free to ask if the operator (or plane itself) have any accidents or incidents in its history.
Equipment trust certificate (ETC): Most commonly used in North America. A trust of investors purchases the aircraft and then "leases" it to the operator, on condition that the airline will receive title upon full performance of the lease. ETCs blur the line between finance leasing and secured lending, and in their most recent forms have begun to resemble securitization arrangements.

Companies like Surf Air and FLITE Air Taxi can charge less than big-name competitors, in part, because they use different planes — like, for example, single-prop turbo planes — that cost less to operate because they use less fuel than larger jets. “The operational cost can be a fraction of other planes,” says Justin Hart, vice president of Surf Air memberships.

Convenience - There are over 5,000 airports in the US that private planes can use (vs 500 airports for larger commercial aircraft). This means you can often land closer to your true destination. In the summer of 2006 the ban on liquids caused all sorts of inconveniences for people flying commercially, but private flyers avoided all this. Private planes also mean that you can travel with your special belongings such as instruments, sports gear, product samples or bring your pet in the cabin.

Prospective aircraft buyers often look for jets for sale by searching Google, gathering information on various makes & models and their performance characteristics, and on condition, age, price and other information about specific jets for sale. Most private airplane buyers use standard phrases like: "airplanes for sale", "private jets on sale" or "airplanes on market" for their search.
Once you've got a price quote, it's worth the effort to call around and get three or four other quotes. Prices vary widely, and one of the most important things to know is that you will often be paying for the plane to get to you, also known as the repositioning fee. Additional charges, common to a lot of flights, include airport charges. At New Jersey's Teterboro, it's $100, while some airports with higher density have an added fee. There are also takeoff fees to consider.
About 70% of the fleet was in North America at the end of 2011. The European market is the next largest, with growing activity in the Middle East, Asia, and Central America.[8] In 2015 the total airplane billing amounted to US$21.9 billion, and 718 business jets were delivered to customers across the globe : 199 (27.7%) by Bombardier Aerospace, 166 (23.1%) by Cessna, 154 (21.4%) by Gulfstream Aerospace, 120 (16.7%) by Embraer and 55 (7.7%) by Dassault Falcon.[9]
×