The Bombardier Challenger 600 began as a proof-of-concept business aircraft design from American aircraft pioneer Bill Lear. The design was subsequently purchased by Canadair, the predecessor to Bombardier, in the late 1970s. Canadair further refined the design and certified the aircraft in 1980. The type really “took off,” so to speak, with the follow-on Challenger 601, introduced in 1983, which replaced its predecessor’s Avro Lycoming engines with modern General Electric CF43-1A turbofans designed for high-utilization commercial airline service.
Privacy is one of the main advantages of a charter flight.  Unlike a commercial flight, where travelers are herded through a crowded airport, having to undergo an intrusive security screening, passengers on a charter flight depart from a private facility known as an FBO.  At most private airports, passengers can pull their cars right up to the plane.
PrivateJets.com is an online charter marketplace brought to you by Sentient Jet, the largest arranger of private air charter in the U.S.  Sentient was founded in 1999 and has over ten years of leadership and experience in private aviation.  PrivateJets.com was created to provide a comprehensive online resource for all types of private jet travelers.

Some prefer more specific terms that may include a manufacturer’s name along with the aircraft model number, and configuration features such as a distinct cabin layout or upgraded avionics package. However, even using very specific terms when searching for aircraft for sale online may miss some listings due to variations in identification; for example, “Gulfstream G550” vs. “Gulfstream G-550.” More inclusive searches, such as “Gulfstream, large-cabin jet” yield more results.


The forward wing sweep, 20,280 pounds (9.20 t) MOTW Hamburger Flugzeugbau HFB 320 Hansa Jet first flew on 21 April 1964, powered by two General Electric CJ610, 47 were built between 1965 and 1973. The joint Piaggo-Douglas, 18,000 pounds (8.2 t) MOTW Piaggio PD.808 first flew on 29 August 1964, powered by two Armstrong Siddeley Vipers, 24 were built for the Italian Air Force.
×