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On 1 April 2017, there were 22,368 business jets in the worldwide fleet, of which 11.2% were for sale.[5] 5-year old aircraft residual value level is at a 56% of the list price.[6] A new business aircraft depreciate by 50% in five years before depreciation flattens between years 10 and 15, and the owner of a 15 to 20 years old is often the last, matching luxury cars.[7]


In the United States, business aircraft may be operated under either FAR 91 as private operations for the business purposes of the owner, or under FAR 135 as commercial operations for the business purposes of a third party. One common arrangement for operational flexibility purposes is for the aircraft's owner to operate the aircraft under FAR 91 when needed for its own purposes, and to allow a third-party charter-manager to operate it under FAR 135 when the aircraft is needed for the business purposes of third parties (such as for other entities within the corporate group of the aircraft's owner).[16]
Some other examples of prices come from Avinode, which powers a charter marketplace for brokers and operators and gathers a large amount of data on pricing. Their recent data shows the average price per hour for return trips, for various aircraft. As noted above, these rates can vary depending on when you fly, where you fly and if your flight is one way or return, plus landing fees, ramp fees and any repositioning can all add to the costs. Always ask for a fully inclusive quote from your broker or operator.
In October 2017 Jetcraft forecasts 8,349 unit deliveries in the next decade for $252 billion, a 30.2 $M average. Cessna should lead the numbers with 27.3% of the deliveries ahead of Bombardier with 20.9% while Gulfstream would almost lead the revenue market share with 27.8% trailing Bombardier with 29.2%.[6] For 2016-2025, Jetcraft forecasted Pratt & Whitney Canada should be the first engine supplier with 30% of the $24B revenue, in front of the current leader Rolls-Royce at 25%. Honeywell will hold 45% of the avionics $16B revenue ahead of Rockwell Collins with 37% and Garmin.[10]
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