Over the past several years, global economic conditions led to record levels of pre-owned private aircraft listed for sale, ranging from smaller, propeller-driven airplanes to the largest, most advanced, and most luxurious intercontinental business jets. This truly resulted in a ‘buyer’s market,’ with purchasers able to select from a high number of quality aircraft, often for comparatively low prices.
A public charter is one in which a tour operator rents the aircraft and advertises and sells seats to members of the public, either directly or through a travel agent. In the case of public charters, the flight must be filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the tour operator must supply a charter prospectus. The tour operator also must assume a legal responsibility to provide the transportation service, and must abide by DOT requirements for the protection of the clients' money. Public charters often operate only seasonally, and are often sold as part of a vacation package deal, although spare seats may be offered at bargain prices.

Private aircraft finance options provide a variety of ways to purchase or lease an aircraft that can be tailored to meet the financial needs of almost any business or individual with ongoing need for access to a business jet. The aircraft financing professionals at TPJC stand ready to discuss all your options and arrange a financing solution to meet your business jet purchasing needs. Please contact us at 561-691-3545. A global company, TPJC professionals are available 24/7/365.
A single-entity charter is one in which an individual or company charters a plane and bears the entire cost of the flight, so that the passengers do not pay their own airfare. There is no minimum passenger requirement, since the cost is per flight, not per person. Single-entity charters are typically used for business purposes -- for example, travel to meetings and conferences, incentive travel or VIP leisure travel.
How can these and other similar companies afford to offer such low rates? One reason is that sites like JetSuite.com are offering seats on flights that would have been empty or at least not full. “Over 40% of flights that are flying private have empty seats,” says Steve King, the co-founder of private jet charter company AeroIQ. Many times, these flights are simply repositioning so they can pick up passengers in another city and the companies would rather get some money from passengers than no money.

Charter, also called air taxi or ad-hoc flights require certification from the associated country's regulating body such as the FAA in the U.S. The regulations are differentiated from typical commercial/passenger service by offering a non-scheduled service. In the U.S. these flights are regulated under FAA Part 135[1]. There are some cases where a charter operator can sell scheduled flights, but only in limited quantities[2].
Aircraft leases are often used by private aircraft operators, as leases provide the same level of access to an aircraft that ownership provides, without the capital expenditure buying a business jet requires. Leases are offered in two main forms: wet leasing, normally used for short-term access; and dry leasing, typically used for longer term leases. Under wet leases, flight crews are provided in tandem with the aircraft, while operators of dry leased aircraft supply their own crews. Combination wet-dry leases may also be offered, as when an aircraft is wet leased to establish service, and once an in-house flight crew is trained, switched to a dry lease.
Private Jet Services has a vast client base that stretches throughout the sports, entertainment, corporate and government industries. Since its foundation in 2003, PJS has supported recording artists such as The Rolling Stones, Maroon 5, Beyonce, Guns N’ Roses and Fleetwood Mac, along with multiple professional and NCAA athletic teams. Altogether, our clients have won an impressive number of awards and trophies, demonstrating that only the best fly with PJS.
Overseeing every detail of your trip are handpicked A&K staff members, including the Tour Director and Tour Managers. These globe-spanning experts travel with you from start to finish to keep things running smoothly while the finest local guides join you in each destination to add a personal perspective to every encounter. A dedicated Luggage Manager also accompanies your journey, overseeing the handling of your luggage between each destination as part of A&Ks Travelling Bell Boy® service.
For those who don't mind mingling with strangers, companies like Tradewind offer shuttles between places like New York and Boston, Stowe, and Nantucket, as well as Caribbean Islands like St. Barth's and Anguilla. (Flights begin at $250 plus tax each way.) The bonus? On a route from from San Juan to St. Barth's, a Tradewind rep will meet you at your terminal and help shuttle you through. JetSuiteX, affiliated with JetBlue, sells seats on planes between Burbank and Las Vegas.
As private jets are constantly moving between locations, the guide prices provided below are based on various data sources relating to the aircraft's last known position. Due to this, not ALL available aircraft are included within the search results. So please contact one of our charter experts for a fixed quotation, as they are aware of all aircraft available in specific locations at any given time.
Waiting until the last minute isn’t an option for most travelers, of course. For those whose schedules can’t accommodate a last-minute booking, there are other options, though they can be pricier. West Coast airline Surf Air offers unlimited private plane flights to and from roughly a dozen California and Nevada locales like Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Santa Barbara for $1,750 per month (plus a one-time $1000 initiation fee); the airline operates up to 90 flights each day and it added Monterey, Calif., to its list of itineraries on July 13, 2015.
The Bombardier Challenger 600 began as a proof-of-concept business aircraft design from American aircraft pioneer Bill Lear. The design was subsequently purchased by Canadair, the predecessor to Bombardier, in the late 1970s. Canadair further refined the design and certified the aircraft in 1980. The type really “took off,” so to speak, with the follow-on Challenger 601, introduced in 1983, which replaced its predecessor’s Avro Lycoming engines with modern General Electric CF43-1A turbofans designed for high-utilization commercial airline service.

Customers spend time with a full-service design team to decide how they want to outfit the plane’s interior. Interiors can be customized to align with the branding of a company, the tastes of an owner, or the operational needs of the flight department. Some notable interior options for the Citation Longitude are the side-facing couch, optional crew jump seat, and solid surface flooring. The Longitude offers an inflight-accessible baggage compartment, and its ceiling extends to 6 feet, making it easy for most people to stand up. Textron Aviation
Stratos Jet Charters, Inc. Serves As An Agent For Air Charter Services On Behalf Of Our Clients. All Aircraft And Air Carriers Selected By Stratos Jet Charters Are Fully Certified By The Federal Aviation Administration And The U.S. Department Of Transportation Under Part 135 Regulations. Carriers Are Solely Responsible For The Air Transportation Arranged On Behalf Of Stratos Jet Charters Clients. Stratos Jet Charters Does Not Own Or Operate Any Aircraft. Stratos Jet Charters Is Not A Direct Or Indirect Air Carrier. All Flights Chartered Through Stratos Jet Charters Are Operated By Part 135 Air Carriers. © 2007-201​8 STRATOS JET CHARTERS, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Fractional ownership of aircraft involves an individual or corporation who pays an upfront equity share for the cost of an aircraft. If four parties are involved, a partner would pay one-fourth of the aircraft price (a "quarter share"). That partner is now an equity owner in that aircraft and can sell the equity position if necessary. This also entitles the new owner to a certain number of hours of flight time on that aircraft, or any comparable aircraft in the fleet. Additional fees include monthly management fees and incidentals such as catering and ground transportation. In the United States, fractional-ownership operations may be regulated by either FAA part 91 or part 135.
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