Every aspect of our operations at PACI revolves around a steadfast commitment to safety. To ensure maximum safety for our customers, all aircraft operated by PACI are IS-BAO Registered, ARGUS Platinum Rated, Wyvern Approved and have a robust Safety Management System (SMS) and a comprehensive Emergency Response Plan (ERP). All charter flights are tracked by FAA licensed dispatchers in our 24/7 Operation Control Center. Pentastar Aviation meets the maximum industry safety standards.
Overseeing every detail of your trip are handpicked A&K staff members, including the Tour Director and Tour Managers. These globe-spanning experts travel with you from start to finish to keep things running smoothly while the finest local guides join you in each destination to add a personal perspective to every encounter. A dedicated Luggage Manager also accompanies your journey, overseeing the handling of your luggage between each destination as part of A&Ks Travelling Bell Boy® service.

With its dedication to helping clients buy and sell aircraft, The Private Jet Company (TPJC) realizes that clients sometimes need financing in order to complete a timely transaction. To meet these customer needs, TPJC can assist and at times provide financing to help expedite a private aircraft purchase. Financing the purchases of private aircraft is similar to mortgage or automobile loans, though the details of the agreements are much more complex, and the aircraft purchase price usually much greater than a home or car. TPJC’s in-house financing specialists can assist with all aspects of transaction financing, but the basic transaction process of a private jet aircraft acquisition is often as follows:
The Gulfstream G650ER, which retails for $70.15 million fully outfitted, can travel 7,500 nautical miles/13,890 kilometers at Mach 0.85. When flying even faster at Mach 0.90, it can carry eight passengers 6,400 nm/11,853 km. Hodge adds that it is important to know the general travel mission when determining the size of the plane. If certain airports are used, a broker can help buyers understand if a plane can regularly take off and land there with a full payload. Gulfstream
How can these and other similar companies afford to offer such low rates? One reason is that sites like JetSuite.com are offering seats on flights that would have been empty or at least not full. “Over 40% of flights that are flying private have empty seats,” says Steve King, the co-founder of private jet charter company AeroIQ. Many times, these flights are simply repositioning so they can pick up passengers in another city and the companies would rather get some money from passengers than no money.

Aircraft leases are often used by private aircraft operators, as leases provide the same level of access to an aircraft that ownership provides, without the capital expenditure buying a business jet requires. Leases are offered in two main forms: wet leasing, normally used for short-term access; and dry leasing, typically used for longer term leases. Under wet leases, flight crews are provided in tandem with the aircraft, while operators of dry leased aircraft supply their own crews. Combination wet-dry leases may also be offered, as when an aircraft is wet leased to establish service, and once an in-house flight crew is trained, switched to a dry lease.
Aircraft charter brokers have entered the marketplace through the ease of setting up a website and business online. Aircraft charter operators are legally responsible for the safe operation of aircraft and charter brokers require no economic authority and are largely unregulated. The Department of Transportation requires that air charter brokers disclose to the consumer that they do not operate aircraft and cannot use terms like "our fleet of aircraft", "we operate", "our charter service" and others.[17]
The forward wing sweep, 20,280 pounds (9.20 t) MOTW Hamburger Flugzeugbau HFB 320 Hansa Jet first flew on 21 April 1964, powered by two General Electric CJ610, 47 were built between 1965 and 1973. The joint Piaggo-Douglas, 18,000 pounds (8.2 t) MOTW Piaggio PD.808 first flew on 29 August 1964, powered by two Armstrong Siddeley Vipers, 24 were built for the Italian Air Force.
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