Ms. Broder frequently books private jets for clients and gets a weekly list from several private jet companies of empty leg availability for the coming week (other agents specializing in private jet travel also get similar lists). Recent flights included an $8,500 trip from Naples to Cleveland on a Beechjet 400A, a plane that seats seven people, and a $6,500 trip from Scottsdale, Ariz., to Colorado Springs on a Learjet 45XR, accommodating eight fliers.
Paul Cappuccio, who lives in Greenwich, Conn., and is the general counsel for Time Warner, flew to Miami on Blade most weekends last winter and plans to do the same this year. “It’s such a relaxed way to fly, an elegant experience and so hassle-free,” he said. While not necessarily budget-friendly, Mr. Cappuccio said that Blade hits the sweet spot on price. “It’s not all that much more than a full-fare first-class ticket, but a small fraction of what it would cost to fly on a chartered private jet,” he said.
Once you've got a price quote, it's worth the effort to call around and get three or four other quotes. Prices vary widely, and one of the most important things to know is that you will often be paying for the plane to get to you, also known as the repositioning fee. Additional charges, common to a lot of flights, include airport charges. At New Jersey's Teterboro, it's $100, while some airports with higher density have an added fee. There are also takeoff fees to consider.
The key words here are prop planes, turboplanes, and light jets. Prop planes like the Cessna Caravan are popular because they're roomy (the seats are like business class, and often configured face to face). More popular these days are planes like the six- to eight-seater Pilatus PC-12, and KingAirs, which fly faster and feel more like jets. And then you get into light jets like Learjets, Embraer Phenom 300s, and Citation CJ3s, and Hawkers, all of which are sleeker and more streamlined, and can fly for four to five hours, for slightly longer trips.

Using a private jet rental to get to a holiday destination ensures the additional benefit of access to private terminals for faster security check-ins, ensuring that more time is spent enjoying the getaway instead of waiting in line. With its ability to access more locations around the world and enhanced potential for personalisation, chartering privately is the perfect way to travel for pleasure.
Whether you travel frequently for business or only occasionally for pleasure, chances are you've considered hiring a charter plane. When you fly on a private plane, you can skip the long wait times and baggage checks of a commercial flight. Your departure and return times are determined by your schedule, and in some cases you can even book a same-day flight! Here are some of our most commonly asked questions regarding private flights:
A public charter is one in which a tour operator rents the aircraft and advertises and sells seats to members of the public, either directly or through a travel agent. In the case of public charters, the flight must be filed with the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the tour operator must supply a charter prospectus. The tour operator also must assume a legal responsibility to provide the transportation service, and must abide by DOT requirements for the protection of the clients' money. Public charters often operate only seasonally, and are often sold as part of a vacation package deal, although spare seats may be offered at bargain prices.
Let us help you determine if aircraft leasing is the right option for your business jet needs. TPJC’s finance and brokerage professionals can answer all your questions about leasing and other acquisition solutions, or advise you on any other business aviation issues. Please call us at 561-691-3545. A global company, our experts are available 24/7/365. We look forward to serving you.
The forward wing sweep, 20,280 pounds (9.20 t) MOTW Hamburger Flugzeugbau HFB 320 Hansa Jet first flew on 21 April 1964, powered by two General Electric CJ610, 47 were built between 1965 and 1973. The joint Piaggo-Douglas, 18,000 pounds (8.2 t) MOTW Piaggio PD.808 first flew on 29 August 1964, powered by two Armstrong Siddeley Vipers, 24 were built for the Italian Air Force.
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